CWT Bibliography

Charters

2015 Coweeta LTER Graduate Student Committee Organizational Charter. Manuscript on File. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

Abstract
The Coweeta Graduate Committee exists to give a voice to students participating in Coweeta-LTER supported research. Coweeta LTER scientists are dispersed at multiple universities yet share research interests; collaborations among scientists from different disciplines with different specialties enhance the overall research program. To enhance the collaborative environment within the Coweeta LTER the council is charged with facilitating communication among students at different universities, giving feedback to the Coweeta LPI(s), the Information Manager, and the Scientific Advisory Council, and coordinating graduate student responses to requests for information from Coweeta LTER leadership.

Reports

2016 Coweeta LTER Winter All-PI Meeting. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

2015 Coweeta LTER Annual Report. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

2015 Coweeta LTER Summer Science Meeting. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

2015 Coweeta LTER Winter All-PI Meeting. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

2014 Coweeta LTER Annual Report. Manuscript on File, University of Georgia.

2014 Coweeta LTER Summer Science Meeting. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

2014 Coweeta LTER Winter All-PI Meeting. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

2013 Coweeta LTER Annual Report. Manuscript on File, University of Georgia.

2013 Coweeta LTER Field Station and Marine Labs Grant Annual Report: Near-Real Time Data Streaming from the Coweeta LTER Environmental Sensor Network. Pages 6 in: Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia., Athens, GA.

2013 Coweeta LTER Summer Science Meeting. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

2013 Coweeta LTER Winter All-PI Meeting. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

2012 Coweeta Long Term Ecological Research: Informational Brochure. Manuscript on File, University of Georgia.

Abstract
The Coweeta Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) Program is based on a long-term collaboration between the University of Georgia Research Foundation in Athens, Georgia, and the USDA Forest Service Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory in Macon County, North Carolina.

2012 Coweeta LTER Annual Report. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

2012 Coweeta LTER Summer Science Meeting. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

2012 Coweeta LTER Winter All-PI Meeting. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

2012 CWT LTER Science Advisory Committee Meeting Notes, 27 June 2012. Manuscript on File, University of Georgia.

2011 Coweeta Long Term Ecological Research Program. Panel Mid-term Review Report. Manuscript on File, University of Georgia.

Abstract
The panel met on June 28-29 with PIs, collaborators, and graduate students at the Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory in Otto, North Carolina. The site is part of the USDA Forest Service Southern Research Station and the central location for the Coweeta LTER. The charge for the team was to visit the site, review accomplishments and plans in five review categories (listed below), and write a report to NSF containing an evaluation and recommendations. The five review criteria were: Intellectual Merit 1) Research: site-level, including synthesis 2) Research: cross-site, network, and international research and synthesis Broader Impacts 3) Outreach, Education, and Training 4) Information management/Information technology 5) Site and Project Management The review team was provided with a document containing a brief overview of the research program, the site review schedule, the field trip overview, and abstracts of talks and student posters. The review team requested and received a copy of the funded proposal with addenda, lists of cross site and outreach activities, and access to the data management system. The report provides a summary of our findings and recommendations for improvement during the remaining grant period.

2011 Coweeta LTER Annual Report. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

2011 Coweeta LTER Mid-Term Review: Site Review Information Pamphlet. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

2011 Coweeta LTER Winter All-PI Meeting. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

2010 Coweeta LTER Annual Report. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

2010 Coweeta LTER Winter All-PI Meeting. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

2009 Coweeta LTER Annual Report. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

2009 Coweeta LTER Summer Science Meeting. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

2009 Coweeta LTER Winter All-PI Meeting. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

2008 Coweeta LTER Annual Report. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

2007 Coweeta LTER Annual Report. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

2006 Coweeta LTER Annual Report. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

2006 Coweeta LTER Summer Science Meeting. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

2006 Coweeta LTER Winter ALL-PI Meeting. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

Coweeta LTER. 2006. Coweeta Long Term Ecological Research: Informational Brochure. Manuscript on File, University of Georgia.

Abstract
The Coweeta Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) Program is the centerpiece of a cooperative effort between the University of Georgia and the USDA Forest Service Coweet Hydrologic Laboratory, funded by the National Science Foundation since 1980.

2005 Coweeta LTER Annual Report. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

2005 Coweeta LTER Summer Science Meeting. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

2005 Coweeta LTER Winter ALL-PI Meeting. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

2004 Coweeta LTER Annual Report. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

2004 Coweeta LTER Summer Science Meeting. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

2004 Coweeta LTER Winter ALL-PI Meeting. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

2003 Coweeta LTER Annual Report. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

2003 Coweeta LTER Summer Science Meeting. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

2003 Coweeta LTER Winter ALL-PI Meeting. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

2002 Coweeta LTER Annual Report. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

2002 Coweeta LTER Summer Science Meeting. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

2002 Coweeta LTER Winter ALL-PI Meeting. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

2001 Coweeta LTER Annual Report. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

2001 Coweeta LTER Summer Science Meeting. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

2001 Coweeta LTER Winter ALL-PI Meeting. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

2000 Coweeta LTER Annual Report. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

2000 Coweeta LTER Summer Science Meeting. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

2000 Coweeta LTER Winter ALL-PI Meeting. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

1999 Coweeta LTER Annual Report. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

1998 Coweeta LTER Annual Report. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

1998 Coweeta LTER Summer Science Meeting. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

1997 Coweeta LTER Annual Report. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

1997 Coweeta LTER Summer Science Meeting. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

Proposals

Examining long-term southern Appalachian ecosystem dynamics through interactions and indirect effects: Renewal proposal to the National Science Foundation. 2016. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

Abstract
The southern Appalachian forest biome is responding to a series of past and ongoing disturbances including increasing hydroclimate extremes, higher temperatures, lengthening growing seasons, and continuing exurbanization. A suite of experimental manipulations, observational studies, social science analysis, and regional modeling will be conducted to understand how ecosystem responses to increasing hydroclimate variability are mediated by interactions and indirect effects involving competition, the complex topography, disturbance, and land use. The manipulative Future Forest Experiments (FFEs), conducted at plot, stream-reach, and watershed scales, will anchor the research program and create targeted forest compositions to examine how the five core ecosystem processes differ among current and likely future forest conditions. Socioecological research will explore how social networks within and beyond the focal region influence environmental knowledge, land use decisions, and environmental governance. These two research endeavors together will provide mechanistic understanding of interactions to be examined at regional scales using the RHESSys model framework adopted by CWT in 2007. Interaction theory serves as the conceptual framework for examining ecosystem dynamics, and the analytical means for quantifying interactions and indirect effects among the factors under investigation. This research builds on long-term monitoring within and beyond the Coweeta Basin that includes >20 years of tree demographic data representing >350,000 tree-years, and diverse spatially extensive physical, biological, and socioeconomic data with some record lengths exceeding 100 years.

The Interacting Effects of Hydroclimate Variability and Human Landscape Modification in the Southern Appalachian Mountains: Renewal proposal to the National Science Foundation. 2014. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

Abstract
In CWT-VII we propose developing a mechanistic understanding of the relationships between ecosystems, organisms, and their responses to the forces of hydroclimate variability and human activities on the land. Hydroclimate comprises the scale-dependent, spatio-temporal components of the water cycle characterized by the means, variability, and extremes of key mesoclimatic and microclimatic variables (Karamouz et al. 2013). Our proposed research furthermore reflects the need to understand ecological processes across broader scales so that we may uncover the feedbacks that link the biophysical and the human realms (Rockström et al. 2009, Chapin et al. 2011, Collins et al. 2011). Our objective in the CWTVII renewal is to understand: How do hydroclimate variability and the human-modified landscape separately and interactively alter southern Appalachian Mountain ecosystem processes and biotic communities that, in turn, affect the vulnerabilities of regional socio-ecological systems?

Addendum 1 to Southern Appalachia on the Edge: Renewal proposal to the National Science Foundation. 2008. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

Addendum 2 to Southern Appalachia on the Edge: Renewal proposal to the National Science Foundation. 2008. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

Addendum 3 to Southern Appalachia on the Edge: Renewal proposal to the National Science Foundation. 2008. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

Southern Appalachia on the Edge: Renewal proposal to the National Science Foundation. 2008. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

Abstract
Multi-scale process-oriented research is proposed on the consequences to the southern Appalachian socio-ecological system of the interaction between changing climate and land use. Landscapes in the southeastern U.S. are expected to change profoundly in the next five decades as the socioeconomic factors driving the dramatic exurbanization of the past three decades persist, and the changes to the rates, frequencies, and intensities of important climatic factors occur. Climate and land use change will especially impact the rural and quasi-rural lands that still characterize much of southern Appalachia where this research is centered. The proposed research will extend long-term measurements, field experiments an interdisciplinary modeling from small watershed studies to regional-scale analyses so as to account for increases in resource demand and competition from adjacent and more distant areas. The research focus will be on the provisioning service of water quantity, the regulating service of water quality, and the supporting service of maintaining biodiversity. The overarching question that guides this research is: How will key ecosystem processes and the focal ecosystem services of water quantity, water quality, and biodiversity be impacted by the: (1) transition in land uses from wildland to urban and peri-urban; (2) changes in climate; and (3) interactions between changes in land use and climate including both on-site and off-site feedbacks?

Renewal proposal to the National Science Foundation. 2002. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

Abstract
The Coweeta LTER Research Program has evolved since 1980 from a site-based to a site- and region-based project examining the effects of disturbance and environmental gradients on biogeochemical cycling, and the underlying watershed ecosystem processes that regulate and respond to those cycles. The current interdisciplinary research integrates ecological and socioeconomic components across 54,000 km2 (Figure 1) of the southern Appalachian Mountains, a biogeophysical and socioeconomic region in which evolutionary and historical processes converge (Whittaker 1956, Markusen 1987, Barnes 1991, Kretzschmar et al. 1993, Bailey 1996). Our research objective in 2002-2008 is to advance scientific understanding of the spatial, temporal, and decision-making components of land use and land-use change in the southern Appalachian Mountains over the last 200 years, and forecast patterns into the future 30 years. Our guiding hypothesis is that the frequency, intensity, and extent of land use represents human decision-making in response to socioeconomic and biogeophysical conditions with consequences that cascade through ecosystems. Our prior research demonstrates that current ecological conditions, including aquatic and terrestrial community structure, nutrient pools, and water quality are not explained without considering past and present land-use. Understanding the causes and consequences of land-use change is a critical research challenge at both national and global scales (Turner et al. 1996, Vitousek et al. 1997, Dale et al. 2000, NRC 2000). Our proposed research will address ecological and socioeconomic aspects of land-use change while continuing our studies of environmental gradients and natural disturbance regimes. This will produce a more complete understanding of ecological dynamics in the southern Appalachian Mountains and make possible the development of reasonable forecasts of its future ecological state.

Progress Report to the National Science Foundation. 1998. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

Abstract
This report presents progress made from 1996 to the present in our integrated Regionalization studies, combining ecological and socio-economic studies in a ten-county southern Appalachian region. In addition, we present detailed plans for continuing and new research to be conducted over the remaining four years of the grant. Our research is concerned with four linked components- 1) prehistoric, historic and contemporary patterns of disturbance and land use; 2) socioeconomic drivers of land use change; 3 and 4) effects of land use change on aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. This research is focused on three main questions, summarized as: how does land use change interact with natural environmental gradients, and human decisions and actions, relating to aquatic and terrestrial ecosystem processes, and are there predictable relationships of the foregoing, carried out over several decades into the future? We focus, in turn, on a delineation of current and future socioeconomic research, showing how human history and preferences inform and shape land and resource use in the southern Appalachians. Specific aspects of land use change on aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems are considered next, and how patterns of use in either one influences events in the other. This includes shifts between agricultural, forest, recreational and second-home development in the Little Tennessee and French Broad River basins. We then examine aspects of land use change as they affect regional C pools and fluxes, relating them to current and projected land use patterns and population growth out to the year 2030 and beyond. Throughout the document, we indicate where presentations and publications have been produced or are in press or submitted on this work. With this document, including the Appendix material, we feel we have laid a solid foundation for performing relevant and important science within the mission of the LTER program.

Renewal proposal to the National Science Foundation. 1996. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

Abstract
We propose research on the extent and complexity of natural and human-caused disturbances, and how they interact with ecological processes along environmental gradients in the landscape. This work builds upon extensive long-term studies of landscape processes in the southern Appalachians and spans four levels of resolution (plot, watershed, landscape, and region) in the Little Tennessee and the French Broad River basins. Individual and interacting effects of disturbance and environmental heterogeneity on populations, communities, and ecological processes forms the unfiying theme of our proposed LTER research. We will focus our research in three areas: 1) characterization of disturbance and environmental heterogeneity in the southern Appalachians, 2) effects of disturbance and environmental heterogeneity on populations and communities, and 3) effects of disturbance and environmental heterogeneity on biogeochemical cycling and ecosystem processes. We will build on our extensive understanding of disturbances occurring within the Coweeta basin and continue to characterize environmental heterogeneity, maintaining continuity in our 60+ year record for some variables. As we expand our focus to the southern Appalachians region, we will also consider the historical fire regime and socio-economic drivers of land use change. The effects of disturbance and environmental heterogeneity on plant and animal populations will be assessed at a range of scales (i.e. plot to region) and we will address key questions on the effects of resource variability on terrestrial and aquatic biodiversity. Using a combination of new studies and continued long-term measurements, we will examine the role of environmental heterogeneity and disturbance in regulating ecosystem pools and processes in streams, riparian zones, and forests. Our research approach utilizes an integrated program of long-term field measurements, experiments, and modeling.

Proposal Summary to the National Science Foundation. 1994. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

Abstract
Our goal is to develop a predictive understanding of the social, economic, and environmental factors that drive land cover change in the southern Appalachians and the ecological consequences of those changes in landscape pattern for regional C cycles and for terrestrial and aquatic biodiversity. We will do this with an integrated program that recognizes humans as an integral part of the Southern Appalachian landscape. We combine the long-term perspective of change in the vegetation and in C stores since the Pleistocene with recent changes in land cover and modeling of human decisions regarding land use to understand past and likely future drivers of changes in landscape pattern in the region. We consider the effects of these landscape changes on regional C storage and rates of flux and on the biota of a region that is characterized by high biodiversity.

Renewal proposal to the National Science Foundation. 1990. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

Abstract
Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory has been the site of interdisciplinary ecological research using experimental watersheds for over twenty years. We propose to continue these long-term studies of response and recovery of Southern Appalachian forested ecosystems to disturbance arid to concentrate on current disturbances that are of major consequence. To understand and predict responses to current and emerging environmental problems (e.g., global climate change) requires an expansion of our research perspective from a watershed to a landscape; hence we propose new studies along a complex environmental gradient with a continued emphasis on use of experimental manipulation to examine ecosystem response to disturbance. The elevational gradient we propose to study represents a gradient in external driving variables (e.g. temperature, precipitation) as well as a gradient in ecosystem response. Three interconnected ecosystems are arrayed along this response gradient at Coweeta: forested slopes, riparian zone, and stream. We propose to test the following ideas in these landscape components: (1) Forest structure and processes in the Southern Appalachians are currently changing as a result of both historic factors and recent drought-induced tree mortality. (2) Differences in structural and functional characteristics of stream ecosystems along elevational and longitudinal gradients are a consequence of changes in the relative abundance of geomorphic patch types along the stream. (3) Rhododendron maximum is a keystone species in the Southern Appalachian landscape, regulating the rates of soluble and particulate element export from the forest and reducing stream productivity.

Renewal proposal to the National Science Foundation. 1985. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

Abstract
This proposal for renewal of the Coweeta Long-Term Ecological Research program represents the efforts of sixteen co-principal investigators. Assembling a proposal of this magnitude within the length guidelines of the National Science Foundation (60 pages of text, 40 pages of appendices) was a major challenge. As reviewers, we applaud the efforts to keep proposals within readable lengths. In our case, to summarize 5 years of research and project 5 years into the future required brutal editing of progress reports contributed by the various Pi's. We believe that this proposal contains the essence of our accomplishments and adequately explains our plans for the next 5 years. The ten-year period, the decade of the 80's, is an exciting one for ecological science. If our rate of progress continues, we anticipate that 1990 will be a time of reflection over a decade of major-progress in long-term ecological research. I hope that this proposal successfully communicates our sense of accomplishment, and our excitement with the entire LTER effort.

Renewal proposal to the National Science Foundation. 1980. Manuscript on file. Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia.

Abstract
The one area in which our understanding of ecosystem dynamics may be the weakest concerns processes and behaviors occurring over long time periods. Over the past two decades research on ecosystem dynamics, in this country and elsewhere, has focused upon processes in undisturbed systems only over relatively short time periods, or on the very earliest phases of ecosystem response to specific experimental manipulations. Data on long-term dynamics of unmanipulated ecosystems, or on the entire successional sequence of ecosystem recovery from disturbance (natural or man induced), are essentially non-existant. Yet it is becoming clear that we must understand ecological processes which occur at frequencies lower than those commoly investigated in current ecological research. Such a conclusion applies whether we are interested in documenting anthropogenic influences on ecosystems, in managing biological and physical resources prudently, or in developing any general theory of ecosystem dynamics. In many cases short term studies, or studies which a priori assume ecosystems to be in functional or compositional steady states, may lead to erroneous conclusions and may obscure fundamental principles of ecosystem organization.