Brian Burke, Assistant Professor, Appalachian State University

Brian Burke

Research Emphasis:

Political economy, political ecology, grassroots development, cooperatives, solidarity economy, and community mobilization for socio-economic and ecological change. My dissertation research focuses on barter systems and alternative currencies established in the city of Medellin, Colombia, during the last 10 years, examining how these systems are integrated into household livelihoods, how they change social relations, and how they alter cultural understandings of the economy and economic subjectivities.

Contact Information:

Primary Organization:  Appalachian State University

E-Mail:  burkebj@appstate.edu

Web Page:  http://sd.appstate.edu/faculty/brian-j-burke


CWT Publications and Presentations: (custom bibliography)

Journal Articles

Brian J. Burke, Meredith Welch-Devine, Seth Gustafson, Nik Heynen, Jennifer L. Rice, Ted L. Gragson, Sakura R. Evans & Donald R. Nelson (2015): Can Science Writing Collectives Overcome Barriers to More Democratic Communication and Collaboration? Lessons from Environmental Communication Praxis in Southern Appalachia, Environmental Communication, DOI: 10.1080/17524032.2014.999695

Burke, B.J., Welch-Devine, M. and Gustafson, S. 2015. Nature Talk in an Appalachian Newspaper: What Environmental Discourse Analysis Reveals about Efforts to Address Exurbanization and Climate Change. Human Organization. 74(2):185-196.

Rice, J.L., Burke, B.J. and Heynen, N. 2015. Knowing climate change, embodying climate praxis: experimential knowledge in southern Appalachia. Annals of the Association of American Geographers. 105(2):253-262. (DOI: 10.1080/00045608.2014.985628)

Rice, Jennifer L.; Burke, Brian J.; Heynen, Nik 2015. Knowing climate change, embodying climate praxis: experiential knowledge in southern Appalachia. Annals of the Association of American Geographers. 105(2): 253-262. 11 p. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00045608.2014.985628

Burke, B.J. and N. Heynen (2014) Transforming Participatory Science into Socio-Ecological Praxis: Valuing Marginalized Environmental Knowledges in the Face of the Neoliberalization of Nature and Science. Environment and Society. 5: 7-27