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Title Implications of groundwater hydrology to buffer designs in the southeastern U.S.
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Abstract

The objective of this study was to examine the hydrologic processes of shallow groundwater to better define and design forest riparian management zones in headwater streams of two contrasting terrains in the southeastern U.S. We employed two long-term experimental watersheds, WS80 (206 ha) and WS77 (151 ha) at the Santee Experimental Forests in South Carolina, and WS2 (12 h) at the Coweeta Hydrologic Lab in the southern Appalachians in North Carolina. These two separate research sites represent a low-gradient and a steep mountain terrain, respectively. We argue that the existing forestry Best Management Practices (BMP) rules on buffer width developed from upland watershed studies may not be adequate in protecting water quality for the low-gradient coastal watersheds. Overland flow in steep upland watersheds rarely occurs, thus attention should be focused on managing subsurface flows and stream bank protections.

Contributors Ge Sun, James M. Vose, Devendra M. Amatya, Carl Trettin and Steven G. McNulty
Citation

Sun, G., J.M. Vose, D. Amatya, C. Trettin, and S.G. McNulty. 2008. Implications of groundwater hydrology to buffer designs in the southeastern U.S. In: AWRA 2008 summer specialty conference. Virginia Beach, VA: American Water Resources Association.

File Date 2008
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