GIS Vector Data - General GIS Data

 
Page 1 of 18  
Category Theme Data Set  (click on title to view file details) Download
General GIS Data Boundaries Study Watersheds 53, 54, and 55 within the Coweeta Basin
Description - This GIS dataset relates to the research done for dataset#3023 that examines the long term effects of litter exclusion, small and large wood removal, and the addition of leaf species of varying detrital quality on organic matter standing crop, export of organic and inorganic particles, and invertebrate abundance and biomass in a high-gradient headwater stream. This study was conducted at the Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory watersheds 53, 54, and 55 from years 1988 through 2006.
(contributed by Rob Benson, 2016)
Jpeg image
      Zip archive
    Coweeta Synoptic Sampling Program Final Parcels
Description - The parcel data was intended to be used for further analysis of the anthropogenic influences on the water quantity and quality. This parcel data was obtained from Macon County GIS and has been clipped to only include the parcel data of the synoptic sampling watersheds.
Note: Parcel data for the synoptic sampling watersheds outside of Macon County are not included. Macon County GIS Discaimer: This map is prepared for the inventory of real property found within this jurisdiction, and is compiled from recorded deeds, plats and other public records and data. Users of this map are hereby notified that the aforementioned public primary information sources should be consulted for verification of the information contained on this map. The county and mapping department assume no legal responsibility for the information contained on this map.
(contributed by John Chamblee, 2011)
Jpeg image
      Zip archive
    Watauga Watershed Boundary
Description - These data were collected to reconstruct spatially-explicit land use/land cover change trajectories that were temporally consistent and at very high accuracies. The data were developed for four watersheds in Macon County, NC: Cartoogechaye, Coweeta, Skeenah Creek Watershed and Watauga. Buildings (pts) and roads (lines) were digitized from historic maps and aerial photographs and aligned where necessary for temporal consistency. Land cover was simultaneously classified across all years for each 25x25m pixel (1/16 ha) in order to maximize temporal consistency. This file includes the watershed boundary used for data development. Watershed boundary Shapefiles were collected from other Coweeta researchers.
(contributed by Ryan Kirk, 2011)
Jpeg image
      Zip archive
    Skeenah Watershed Boundary
Description - These data were collected to reconstruct spatially-explicit land use/land cover change trajectories that were temporally consistent and at very high accuracies. The data were developed for four watersheds in Macon County, NC: Cartoogechaye, Coweeta, Skeenah Creek Watershed and Watauga. Buildings (pts) and roads (lines) were digitized from historic maps and aerial photographs and aligned where necessary for temporal consistency. Land cover was simultaneously classified across all years for each 25x25m pixel (1/16 ha) in order to maximize temporal consistency. This shapefile includes the watershed boundary used for data development. Watershed boundary Shapefiles were collected from other Coweeta researchers.
(contributed by Ryan Kirk, 2011)
Jpeg image
      Zip archive
    Coweeta Watershed Boundary
Description - These data were collected to reconstruct spatially-explicit land use/land cover change trajectories that were temporally consistent and at very high accuracies. The data were developed for four watersheds in Macon County, NC: Cartoogechaye, Coweeta, Skeenah Creek Watershed and Watauga. Buildings (pts) and roads (lines) were digitized from historic maps and aerial photographs and aligned where necessary for temporal consistency. Land cover was simultaneously classified across all years for each 25x25m pixel (1/16 ha) in order to maximize temporal consistency. This file includes the watershed boundary used for data development. Watershed boundary Shapefiles were collected from other Coweeta researchers.
(contributed by Ryan Kirk, 2011)
Jpeg image
      Zip archive
    TIGER 2000 Census Block Groups
Description - The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census Bureau's Master Address File / Topologically Integrated Geographic Encoding and Referencing (MAF/TIGER) Database (MTDB). The MTDB represents a seamless national file with no overlaps or gaps between parts, however, each TIGER/Line File is designed to stand alone as an independent data set, or they can be combined to cover the entire nation. Block Groups (BGs) are defined before tabulation block delineation and numbering, but are clusters of blocks within the same census tract that have the same first digit of their 4-digit census block number from the same decennial census. For example, Census 2000 tabulation blocks 3001, 3002, 3003,..., 3999 within Census 2000 tract 1210.02 are also within BG 3 within that census tract. Census 2000 BGs generally contained between 600 and 3,000 people, with an optimum size of 1,500 people. Most BGs were delineated by local participants in the Census Bureau's Participant Statistical Areas Program (PSAP). The Census Bureau delineated BGs only where the PSAP participant declined to delineate BGs or where the Census Bureau could not identify any local PSAP participant. A BG usually covers a contiguous area. Each census tract contains at least one BG, and BGs are uniquely numbered within census tract. Within the standard census geographic hierarchy, BGs never cross county or census tract boundaries, but may cross the boundaries of other geographic entities like county subdivisions, places, urban areas, voting districts, congressional districts, and American Indian / Alaska Native / Native Hawaiian areas. BGs have a valid code range of 0 through 9. BGs coded 0 were intended to only include water area, no land area, and they are generally in territorial seas, coastal water, and Great Lakes water areas. For Census 2000, rather than extending a census tract boundary into the Great Lakes or out to the U.S. nautical three-mile limit, the Census Bureau delineated some census tract boundaries along the shoreline or just offshore. The Census Bureau assigned a default census tract number of 0 and BG of 0 to these offshore, water-only areas not included in regularly numbered census tract areas.
(contributed by Richard Cary, 2011)
Jpeg image
      Zip archive
    TIGER 2000 Census Blocks
Description - The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census Bureau's Master Address File / Topologically Integrated Geographic Encoding and Referencing (MAF/TIGER) Database (MTDB). The MTDB represents a seamless national file with no overlaps or gaps between parts, however, each TIGER/Line File is designed to stand alone as an independent data set, or they can be combined to cover the entire nation. Census Blocks are statistical areas bounded on all sides by visible features, such as streets, roads, streams, and railroad tracks, and/or by nonvisible boundaries such as city, town, township, and county limits, and short line-of-sight extensions of streets and roads. Census blocks are relatively small in area; for example, a block in a city bounded by streets. However, census blocks in remote areas are often large and irregular and may even be many square miles in area. A common misunderstanding is that data users think census blocks are used geographically to build all other census geographic areas, rather all other census geographic areas are updated and then used as the primary constraints, along with roads and water features, to delineate the tabulation blocks. As a result, all Census 2000 blocks nest within every other Census 2000 geographic area, so that Census Bureau statistical data can be tabulated at the block level and aggregated up to the appropriate geographic areas. Census blocks cover all territory in the United States, Puerto Rico, and the Island Areas (American Samoa, Guam, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, and the U.S. Virgin Islands). Blocks are the smallest geographic areas for which the Census Bureau publishes data from the decennial census. A block may consist of one or more faces.
(contributed by Richard Cary, 2011)
Jpeg image
      Zip archive
    TIGER 2000 Census Tracts
Description - The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census Bureau's Master Address File / Topologically Integrated Geographic Encoding and Referencing (MAF/TIGER) Database (MTDB). The MTDB represents a seamless national file with no overlaps or gaps between parts, however, each TIGER/Line File is designed to stand alone as an independent data set, or they can be combined to cover the entire nation. Census tracts are small, relatively permanent statistical subdivisions of a county or equivalent entity, and were defined by local participants as part of the Census 2000 Participant Statistical Areas Program (PSAP). The Census Bureau delineated the census tracts in situations where no local participant existed or where all the potential participants declined to participate. The primary purpose of census tracts is to provide a stable set of geographic units for the presentation of census data and comparison back to previous decennial censuses. Census tracts generally have a population size between 1,500 and 8,000 people, with an optimum size of 4,000 people. When first delineated, census tracts were designed to be homogeneous with respect to population characteristics, economic status, and living conditions. The spatial size of census tracts varies widely depending on the density of settlement. Physical changes in street patterns caused by highway construction, new development, etc. may require boundary revisions before a census. In addition, census tracts occasionally are split due to population growth, or combined as a result of substantial population decline. Census tract boundaries generally follow visible and identifiable features. They may follow legal boundaries such as minor civil division (MCD) or incorporated place boundaries in some States and situations to allow for census tract-to-governmental unit relationships where the governmental boundaries tend to remain unchanged between censuses. State and county boundaries are always census tract boundaries in the standard census geographic hierarchy. In a few rare instances, a census tract may consist of noncontiguous areas. These noncontiguous areas may occur where the census tracts are coextensive with all or parts of legal entities that are themselves noncontiguous.
(contributed by Richard Cary, 2011)
Jpeg image
265 Records